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US Navy launches two Raytheon-made SM-3 missiles

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US Navy launches two Raytheon-made SM-3 missiles

Posted on 19 September 2013 by admin

In a Missile Defense Agency test, the U.S. Navy launched two Raytheon Company made Standard Missile-3 Block IBs from the USS Lake Erie against a complex, separating short-range ballistic missile target. The first guided missile successfully destroyed the target using the sheer kinetic force of a massive collision in space.

The SM-3 is a defensive weapon used by the U.S. and Japan to defend against short- to intermediate-range ballistic missiles.

“Confidence in the SM-3 Block IB’s defensive capability continues to grow with each flight test,” said Dr. Taylor Lawrence, Raytheon Missile Systems president. “When this weapon deploys in 2015, the U.S. and our allies will have a tremendously reliable, capable defensive asset on their side.”

During the test, two SM-3 interceptors were launched at a single target consecutively. The first SM-3 eliminated the target. The second SM-3 was designed to test the ship weapons system’s ability to launch multiple missiles at one time against a threat. An intercept for the second SM-3 was not part of the test scenario.

“We’re gaining a tremendous amount of information about what this missile can do, and in many instances it is far surpassing design requirements,” said Dr. Mitch Stevison, Raytheon Missile Systems’ SM-3 program director. “The SM-3 Block IB is proving it can take on increasingly sophisticated scenarios, and that kind of confidence sets the stage for a production decision.”

The test was the 25th successful flight test for the SM-3 program and the fourth back-to-back successful test of the next-generation SM-3 Block IB variant. Based on the highly successful SM-3 Block IA currently deployed around the world today, the SM-3 Block IB incorporates an enhanced two-color infrared seeker and the Throttleable Divert and Attitude Control System, a mechanism that propels the missile toward incoming targets.

 

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U.S Navy tests Standard Missile-6 over-the-horizon targets engagement at sea

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U.S Navy tests Standard Missile-6 over-the-horizon targets engagement at sea

Posted on 25 August 2013 by admin

The U.S. Navy fired two Raytheon Company Standard Missile-6 interceptors from the USS Chancellorsville, successfully engaging two cruise missile targets (BQM-74 drones) in the missile’s first over-the-horizon test scenario at sea.

The SM-6 will provide U.S. Navy sailors and their vessels extended range protection against fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles and cruise missiles as part of the Naval Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air (NIFC-CA) mission area.

“The SM-6′s ability to engage threats at significantly greater ranges than other missiles in its class is a game changer for the U.S. Navy,” said Jim Normoyle, Raytheon Missile Systems’ SM-6 program director. “We verified the weapon’s new processor earlier this month, and we’re preparing for the USS Chancellorsville’s Combat Systems Ship Qualification Trials in November.”

In February, Raytheon delivered the first SM-6 from its new $75 million, 70,000 square-foot SM-6 and Standard Missile-3 all-up-round production facility at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala. In May, a Defense Acquisition Board approved full-rate production of the SM-6 missile.

“SM-6 combines the best of our SM-2, SM-3 and AMRAAM missiles, providing an enhanced anti-air warfare and over-the-horizon capability at a reduced cost,” said Mike Campisi, Raytheon Missile Systems’ senior director of Standard Missile-1, -2, and -6 programs. “We have delivered more than 50 missiles ahead of schedule and under cost, and we remain on track to reach initial operating capability in 2013.”

 

 

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Raytheon awarded contract for advanced Standard Missile-3

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Raytheon awarded contract for advanced Standard Missile-3

Posted on 09 August 2013 by admin

Raytheon Company was awarded a $218,530,196 contract by the Missile Defense Agency to complete the assembly and delivery of 29 Standard Missile-3 Block IB missiles. Launched off U.S. Navy ships, SM-3 interceptors protect the U.S. and its allies by destroying incoming short-, medium-, and intermediate-range ballistic missile threats by colliding with them in space.

“The three back-to-back successful SM-3 Block IB flight tests have demonstrated the missile’s advanced capabilities and reliability against various threats in a variety of mission scenarios,” said Dr. Taylor Lawrence, Raytheon Missile Systems president. “Combatant commanders around the world are eager to build up their inventories in support of Phase 2 of the Phased Adaptive Approach starting in 2015.”

Final assembly will take place in Raytheon’s new, state-of-the-art Redstone Missile Integration Facility in Huntsville, Ala. Guidance sections and guidance units will be built at the Raytheon Missile Systems Space Factory in Tucson, Ariz.

“The Redstone Missile Integration Facility will prove critical as we ramp up our manufacturing capacity on the path to SM-3 Block IB full-rate production,” said Dr. Mitch Stevison, Raytheon Missile Systems’ SM-3 program director.

 

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Raytheon, US Army complete first AI3 guided flight test series

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Raytheon, US Army complete first AI3 guided flight test series

Posted on 08 August 2013 by admin

Raytheon Company and the U.S. Army successfully completed the first guided test vehicle (GTV) flight series of the Accelerated Improved Intercept Initiative (AI3) program. The series consisted of two flight tests against different target profiles. In each case after launch, the interceptor initially guided on in-flight radio frequency datalink updates from the fire control radar that was tracking the inbound rocket target threat. The on-board seeker provided the missile’s terminal guidance to intercept the target.

“These tests were the first opportunity to demonstrate the full integration and kill chain of the tactical AI3 Battle Element system,” said Michael Van Rassen, the Army’s Project Director for AI3. “We continue to validate AI3′s enhanced capabilities that will save warfighters’ lives.”

The AI3 Battle Element system consists of the Raytheon AI3 missile and Ku Band Radio Frequency System fire control radar, Avenger AI3 launcher with modified technical fire control, and command and control node. Once fielded, AI3 will enhance protection of warfighters from rockets, artillery, mortars, cruise missiles and unmanned aerial vehicles. AI3 development will culminate in a live-fire engagement scheduled for later this year against a variety of targets. Low-rate initial production is to be determined.

“The success of this first GTV flight test series is a significant milestone for the Army and the Raytheon AI3 team,” said Tom Bussing, Raytheon Missile Systems’ vice president of Advanced Missile Systems. “The interceptor performed exactly as expected. The team continues to demonstrate extraordinary progress in a difficult mission area.”

About AI3

The system will protect warfighters by intercepting rockets in flight.

Raytheon is scheduled to demonstrate the system capability in the third quarter of 2013.

Raytheon has designed the system to meet cost requirements to provide an affordable solution to the warfighter.

Raytheon is building the interceptor and fire control radar and serving as support to the government team, which is the overall mission system integrator.

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U.S Navy completes Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 initial fleet firing

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U.S Navy completes Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 initial fleet firing

Posted on 07 August 2013 by admin

The U.S. Navy completed the first fleet firing of Raytheon Company’s Rolling Airframe Missile Block 2 as part of its ongoing developmental and operational testing (DT/OT).

In an at-sea test conducted from the USS Arlington (LPD 24), two RAM Block 2 missiles engaged a subsonic target in a scenario designed to demonstrate the advanced missile’s defensive capabilities.

This test builds on three DT/OT tests conducted from the U.S. Navy’s Self-Defense Test Ship earlier this year. Those firings successfully engaged both supersonic and sub-sonic maneuvering targets with all RAM Block 2 missiles meeting test objectives. The RAM Block 2 missile is now a perfect 4-for-4 in DT/OT engagements since the start of government testing.

“The first RAM Block 2 firing from a U.S. Navy ship is the culmination of a very strenuous government and industry test program,” said Rick Nelson, vice president of Raytheon Missile Systems’ Naval and Area Defense product line. “We now focus on the U.S. Navy’s initial operational capability milestone along with delivery of the first RAM Block 2 production missiles in 2014.”

Raytheon and its manufacturing partner RAMSYS of Germany were awarded the second U.S. Navy RAM Block 2 low-rate production contract for 61 missiles in December 2012. In addition, as previously reported, Raytheon and RAMSYS received a production contract for 445 RAM Block 2 missiles from the German navy earlier this year.

 

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Raytheon’s two-color 3rd Generation FLIR System successfully tested

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Raytheon’s two-color 3rd Generation FLIR System successfully tested

Posted on 15 July 2013 by admin

Raytheon Company’s 3rd Generation Forward Looking Infrared (3rd Gen FLIR) Improved Target Acquisition System (ITAS) and fire control successfully achieved proof of concept in a series of laboratory and field tests. Preliminary evaluation of the impact of firing all versions of the TOW missile was also performed.

“Raytheon’s FLIR improvement program provides warfighters with better clarity at all ranges, allowing them to identify targets and differentiate between combatants and non-combatants at greater stand-off ranges,” said Jeff Miller, vice president of Combat and Sensing Systems for Raytheon Missile Systems. “Implementing 3rd Gen ITAS FLIR improvements will continue to give our warfighters in the field an unfair advantage in the fight.”

During the test, the 3rd Gen ITAS FLIR demonstrated improved sensor performance and enhanced situational awareness. The demonstration was conducted in the presence of program office personnel from the U.S. Army’s Close Combat Weapons Systems and Army Aviation and Missile Research and Development Engineering Center.

About ITAS
Used by the U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps, ITAS provides highly mobile, adverse-weather, day/night capability needed by early entry forces to counter advanced threats. This latest 3rd Gen ITAS maintains the same near-and-wide fields of view while adding ultra-narrow and ultra-wide fields of view. In addition, Raytheon’s 3rd Gen FLIR combines long-wave and mid-wave infrared and high-definition resolution.

 

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US Navy to procure Joint Standoff Weapon C-1 from Raytheon

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US Navy to procure Joint Standoff Weapon C-1 from Raytheon

Posted on 10 July 2013 by admin

Raytheon Company (received an $80.5 million production contract award from the U.S. Navy to procure Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) C-1′s. The contract was awarded in Raytheon’s second quarter of 2013.

“JSOW C-1 enables the warfighter to precisely engage targets well beyond most enemy air defenses, thus limiting the threat of adversarial forces,” said Celeste Mohr, JSOW program director for Raytheon Missile Systems. “JSOW is exceptionally dependable and provides immeasurable value to the warfighter.”

The JSOW C-1 adds a weapon datalink radio and modified seeker software to the existing JSOW C, which increases the anti-surface warfare mission capability. The weapon is designed to provide fleet forces with the capability and flexibility to engage moving maritime targets, while retaining its robust capability against stationary land targets.

“With more than 400 JSOW A’s employed in combat, this weapon has stood the tests of time,” said Harry Schulte, vice president of Air Warfare Systems for Raytheon Missile Systems. “Furthermore, the JSOW program has sustained on-time deliveries for 11 years while concurrently maintaining costs. The JSOW has a remarkable record of reliability, resourcefulness and accuracy.”

Work on the contract will be performed in Tucson, Ariz.; Cedar Rapids, Iowa; McAlester, Okla.; and Dallas, Texas. Delivery of the missiles is scheduled to begin in the second quarter of 2014.

About the Joint Standoff Weapon 
JSOW is a family of low-cost, air-to-ground weapons that employs an integrated GPS-inertial navigation system and terminal imaging infrared seeker. JSOW C-1 adds the two-way Strike Common Weapon Datalink to the combat-proven weapon, enabling a moving maritime target capability. JSOW C-1 will provide an advanced anti-surface warfare solution on the F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft.

 

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US Navy awards contract for Ship Self-Defense System to Raytheon

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US Navy awards contract for Ship Self-Defense System to Raytheon

Posted on 05 November 2012 by admin

Raytheon has been awarded a $22.5 million U.S. Navy contract for the Ship Self-Defense System. With this award, Raytheon will continue system development, test and integration, as well as Platform Systems Engineering Agent (PSEA) services and support for fleet-deployed systems.

 

 

SSDS is an open, distributed combat management system in service on carriers and amphibious ships, including CVN, LSD dock landing ship, LPD, LHA and LHD classes. The LHA variant is nearing initial deployment, a technical refresh of the LSD-class is almost complete, and system development is underway for the new CVN 78-class of aircraft carriers. SSDS is designed to expedite the detect-to-engage sequence to defend against anti-ship cruise missiles. The system integrates and automates standalone sensors and weapon systems to provide the required, quick response and multi-target engagement capability.

 

 

“SSDS is a deployed and proven combat management system, delivering outstanding capabilities and performance as well as the reliability, refresh and the inherent interoperability benefits of an open architecture design,” said Kevin Peppe, vice president of Seapower Capability Systems for Raytheon’s Integrated Defense Systems business. “The evolution of SSDS — spanning decades, ship classes, sensors and weapons systems — demonstrates Raytheon’s ability to deliver innovation in a platform-agnostic approach for all major naval surface platforms.”

 

 

In addition to the contract, the Navy has announced its intent to increase the current PSEA contract ceiling by $50 million to extend SSDS services and support through its Fiscal Year 2013. Raytheon has been the SSDS PSEA since 2008, providing ongoing maintenance, upgrades and lifecycle support for both new ship programs as well as legacy ships. As PSEA, Raytheon has achieved consistently favorable customer performance ratings over the life of the contract.

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